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[UPDATED] What You Need to Know About the US Travel Ban

Appeals court lets travel ban go partially into effect

Update November 21 – The United States travel ban will go partially into effect. That was decided by a US appeals court in California on Monday. The Trump administration had requested blocking at least temporarily a judge’s ruling that had put the new ban on hold. The ruling means the ban applies to people from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, and Chad who do not have connections to the US. The ban does not apply to people with family relationships and formal relationships with US-based entities, such as universities.

In a reaction published by Reuters, a Justice Department spokesperson said: “We are reviewing the court’s order, and the government will begin enforcing the travel proclamation consistent with the partial stay. We believe that the proclamation should be allowed to take effect in its entirety.”

Update October 18 – The travel ban, which attempts to block travelers from a handful of countries from coming to the United States hit another legal bump on Tuesday. A federal judge in Hawaii issued a nationwide order freezing most of the third version of the travel ban the day before it was to take effect, CNN reports.

Judge Derrick Watson said the travel ban “plainly discriminates based on nationality.” The executive order “suffers from precisely the same maladies as its predecessor: it lacks sufficient findings that the entry of more than 150 million nationals from six specified countries would be ‘detrimental to the interests of the United States,'” Watson wrote in a statement.

Update October 17 – A US judge questioned administration’s’s attorneys about a classified report the government is using to justify its latest ban on citizens of some countries from entering the United States. US District Court Judge Theodore Chuang in Maryland heard arguments for and against the new travel ban, which set to take effect on Wednesday. It limits travel from Iran, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Chad and North Korea indefinitely. All those countries except Chad and North Korea were included in two earlier versions of the travel ban.

Update June 30 – The revised travel ban is set to take effect immediately. The State Department issued new guidelines to American embassies and consulates on how to apply the limited travel ban for foreign visitors from Syria, Sudan, Somalia, Libya, Iran and Yemen. Parents, spouses, children, stepchildren and in-laws are regarded as “close family”, and may enter the country. But grandparents, aunts and uncles do not.
Update June 26 – The US Supreme Court has partially lifted the travel ban. The court effectively said that foreigners who had never been to the United States, or have no family, business or other ties could be prohibited, CNN reports.
The justices also said they would consider in October whether the travel ban in its full form should be upheld or struck down. The Supreme Court said in Monday’s ruling: “In practical terms, this means that [the executive order] may not be enforced against foreign nationals who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States. All other foreign nationals are subject to the provisions.”

Update May 26 – A US federal appeals court on May 25 rejected to reinstate his travel ban on people from six predominantly Muslim nations. Attorney General Jeff Sessions quickly vowed to appeal to the Supreme Court.

The revised order issued on March 6, “speaks with vague words of national security, but in context drips with religious intolerance, animus and discrimination,” the United States Court of Appeals concluded. Attorney General Sessions said in a statement that the government, would seek a review of the case at the Supreme Court. He says the temporary travel ban is needed to protect the country from terrorist attacks.

Situation 6th March

On the 27th of January, the President of the United States signed an executive order barring refugees from entering the United States for 120 days. Immigrants from seven nations have also been banned for three months, causing a drastic change in the immigration system. The federal court blocked the travel ban on the 9th of February. On March 6th, President Donald Trump issued a new immigration ban order.

The President of United States new executive order travel ban issued is not immediate, it will go into effect on March 16. The list now consists of Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen and Somalia. Iraq is no longer on the list of countries impacted by the travel ban, although Iraqi nationals seeking admission to the U.S. may undergo enhanced screening.

The new travel ban does not apply to people with current visas, like temporary, non-immigrant visas for students and workers. Students with valid F, M or J visas can enter the United States. The first proposed ban also affected current visa holders and like the original order, the travel ban also applies to people from the six targeted countries who newly arrive on immigrant visas.

The travel ban on all refugees to the United States remains set on 120 days. Syrian refugees are now not barred indefinitely, they are considered the same as refugees from other countries. Refugees already granted asylum will be allowed. After the 120 days, the administration will re-evaluate which countries are reinstated for admissions. An additional change is that refugees who belong to a religious minority will no longer be prioritized.

The new executive order explicitly mentions that green card holders from the six countries will be allowed entry. The ban will not apply to dual nationalists who enter the United States presenting a passport from a country that does not fall under the ban. When the previous order was rolled out, there was uncertainty whether dual nationals with passport from targeted countries were allowed.

Situation 9th February

Travel ban blocked by federal court: Several lawsuits have been filed against the ban, and a federal judge has issued a temporary nationwide block on the travel ban. Meaning the travel ban doesn’t apply anymore.

Situation 27th January

The seven countries affected are Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen, and Somalia. The travel ban affects green card holders from these countries and people with valid visas alike.

The signing of the executive order immediately sparked a backlash, and many protesters gathered at airports to react on it. Many people are showing signs of solidarity with the travelers stuck in airports and are supporting those who have been denied access. Airport officials, for the most part, accommodated the protests, temporarily closing security checkpoints and diverting traffic to make room for demonstrators. Were you traveling during the travel ban? Then you possibly faced some hold-up while maneuvering through the airport due to the demonstrations.

The President of United States new executive order travel ban issued is not immediate, it will go into effect on March 16. The list now consists of Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen and Somalia. Iraq is no longer on the list of countries impacted by the travel ban, although Iraqi nationals seeking admission to the U.S. may undergo enhanced screening.

The new travel ban does not apply to people with current visas, like temporary, non-immigrant visas for students and workers. Students with valid F, M or J visas can enter the United States. The first proposed ban also affected current visa holders and like the original order, the travel ban also applies to people from the six targeted countries who newly arrive on immigrant visas.

The travel ban on all refugees to the United States remains set on 120 days. Syrian refugees are now not barred indefinitely, they are considered the same as refugees from other countries. Refugees already granted asylum will be allowed. After the 120 days, the administration will re-evaluate which countries are reinstated for admissions. An additional change is that refugees who belong to a religious minority will no longer be prioritized.

The new executive order explicitly mentions that green card holders from the six countries will be allowed entry. The ban will not apply to dual nationalists who enter the United States presenting a passport from a country that does not fall under the ban. When the previous order was rolled out, there was uncertainty whether dual nationals with passport from targeted countries were allowed.

The President of United States new executive order travel ban issued is not immediate, it will go into effect on March 16. The list now consists of Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen and Somalia. Iraq is no longer on the list of countries impacted by the travel ban, although Iraqi nationals seeking admission to the U.S. may undergo enhanced screening.

The new travel ban does not apply to people with current visas, like temporary, non-immigrant visas for students and workers. Students with valid F, M or J visas can enter the United States. The first proposed ban also affected current visa holders and like the original order, the travel ban also applies to people from the six targeted countries who newly arrive on immigrant visas.

The travel ban on all refugees to the United States remains set on 120 days. Syrian refugees are now not barred indefinitely, they are considered the same as refugees from other countries. Refugees already granted asylum will be allowed. After the 120 days, the administration will re-evaluate which countries are reinstated for admissions. An additional change is that refugees who belong to a religious minority will no longer be prioritized.

The new executive order explicitly mentions that green card holders from the six countries will be allowed entry. The ban will not apply to dual nationalists who enter the United States presenting a passport from a country that does not fall under the ban. When the previous order was rolled out, there was uncertainty whether dual nationals with passport from targeted countries were allowed.

The President of United States new executive order travel ban issued is not immediate, it will go into effect on March 16. The list now consists of Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen and Somalia. Iraq is no longer on the list of countries impacted by the travel ban, although Iraqi nationals seeking admission to the U.S. may undergo enhanced screening.

The new travel ban does not apply to people with current visas, like temporary, non-immigrant visas for students and workers. Students with valid F, M or J visas can enter the United States. The first proposed ban also affected current visa holders and like the original order, the travel ban also applies to people from the six targeted countries who newly arrive on immigrant visas.

The travel ban on all refugees to the United States remains set on 120 days. Syrian refugees are now not barred indefinitely, they are considered the same as refugees from other countries. Refugees already granted asylum will be allowed. After the 120 days, the administration will re-evaluate which countries are reinstated for admissions. An additional change is that refugees who belong to a religious minority will no longer be prioritized.

The new executive order explicitly mentions that green card holders from the six countries will be allowed entry. The ban will not apply to dual nationalists who enter the United States presenting a passport from a country that does not fall under the ban. When the previous order was rolled out, there was uncertainty whether dual nationals with passport from targeted countries were allowed.

not for the profit

The situation regarding green card holders seems to vary from time to time. Senior officials at the Department of Homeland Security initially interpreted the executive order to not apply to green card holders from the seven banned countries. The Trump administration overruled that interpretation clarifying that those green card holders were initially barred. Causing even those in-flight to be denied access to the United States. After a short while, a federal judge in New York temporarily blocked part of Trump's order late on Saturday night, ruling that citizens of the seven countries who hold valid visas and have already arrived in the United States cannot be removed from the country. According to CNN, the current situation for US green card holders from Iran, Iraq, Sudan, Syria, Somalia, Libya or Yemen is as follows: “They are allowed to board their plane and fly to the United States. Once they land, their fingerprints and other information will be collected, and they will be subject to a secondary interview, in part, to judge whether the traveler is a national security risk." This means that citizens of the seven affected countries who hold permanent US residency "green cards" will not be barred from re-entering the US, as officials had previously said. This is also the case if these travelers are in the possession of one of these visas:

  • A1 & A2 (Government Officials and immediate family)
  • C2 (Travel to U.N.)
  • G1 & G2 (Representative & employees of international organizations)
  • G3 & G4 (Representatives to and employees of international organizations)
  • NATO

The situation for people from the seven countries banned through the executive order, who also hold valid passports from other countries which haven’t been banned, is also susceptible to change. A major development was that the International Air Transport Association told their airlines that dual nationals who are citizens of one of the seven affected countries and a country that's not on the list, will be subject to additional security screenings, but will likely be allowed through. We highly recommend you to contact us in case you’re traveling to the United States.

We’re a full-service humanitarian travel management company, and we're trying to improve the quality of humanitarian travel by offering advice to humanitarian travelers. We can’t emphasize enough how highly we suggest to contact us if you’re traveling to the United States. Please contact your nearest Raptim office through our quick address locator.

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